The Fracking Poll Results are In

fracking poll resultsResults from a recent survey conducted by Atlanta-based Ecologix Environmental Systems indicate that water treatment can play an important role in industry perceptions of hydraulic fracturing (“fracking”).

“The introduction of new, more-advanced water treatment solutions opens the door to a more balanced discussion about fracking’s potential energy and economic benefits.”

Ecologix, a leading manufacturer of wastewater treatment technologies that can be used to treat frac water, surveyed wastewater and energy industry professionals, asking them to select their top environmental concerns related to fracking.

The results overwhelmingly showed water to be the predominant issue, with 72-percent of respondents stating that water-related environmental problems were their top concern. Two other environmental concerns often cited with fracking, unknown chemical makeup of fracking fluids and lack of industry oversight, were cited as the top concern by 19% and 9% of respondents, respectively.

“Our survey gives a good initial perspective on why the energy industry can and should place more emphasis on water treatment,” said Eli Gruber, president and CEO, Ecologix Environmental Systems. “The introduction of new, more-advanced water treatment solutions opens the door to a more balanced discussion about fracking’s potential energy and economic benefits.”

Energy companies can address the undue stress fracking places on communities and water resources by properly treating frac flowback and produced water on-site. Advanced systems like the Integrated Treatment Solution (ITS), a well-side water treat system from Ecologix, can process up to 900 gallons per minute. Wastewater treated with the ITS can be reused in future fracking operations or released back into the environment, reducing fracking’s overall environmental impact.

High-volume, on-site water treatment significantly reduces drillers’ water transportation needs, eliminating the time and resources needed to haul millions of gallons of untreated water to disposal wells. And it helps drillers to avoid the long-term ecological change possible from injecting water into disposal wells – a process that can result in the permanent removal of large amounts of water from underground aquifers.

“The water treatment industry has progressed to the point where it can remove much of the controversy from the fracking issue,” said Gruber. “Because of this, water treatment solution providers have an obligation to play the role of mediator between energy producers and the community.”

This article was originally published on BusinessWire. View the release here.

Categories: Fracking

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